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As fertility rates plummet, mums launch website to support couples trying to conceive

Fertility rates are plummeting which, according to scientists, will have far-reaching consequences for the future of mankind.

So, a group of mums joined forces during the Covid-19 pandemic to start a fertility media company – despite never meeting in person. 

Founded by former journalist Jules Burke, Best Fertility Now is dedicated to raising awareness of falling fertility rates and offering support to those struggling with infertility.  

Jules (pictured above), who had six rounds of IVF  before conceiving her daughter Cressida, aged four, said the website is less to do with her journey and more a platform for others. It has clocked up four million views this year and has been listed as a trusted provider of fertility news on Google.

She says: “There has been a boom in the past few years of people struggling to have a baby ‘taking control’ by telling their stories. So we were inspired to set up a one-stop shop website with news and videos where everything is gathered together, and we can promote the best social network sites, books and apps, for people starting out on a fertility journey. 

“We are working hard to make it entertaining as well as educational and add celebrity interviews.

Jules (pictured above), who had six rounds of IVF before conceiving her daughter Cressida, aged fou

“We have also set up a video production arm so we can help others produce videos and reels for their social networks because so many people don’t have the time to create them.”

To get things off the ground, Jules recruited a crack team of passionate mums to help her run the website. Together, they tackle topics ranging from global fertility issues and medical advances to podcasts and books that help to educate the masses. As a result of all their hard work, Best Fertility Now has been a huge success. 

In fact, just five months after it launched, it was accepted by Google News as a trusted news service. Now, its readers can rest assured that the information they’re getting is trustworthy and of the highest quality.  

The strangest thing about this well co-ordinated team is the fact that they still have yet to meet. All of their communication has had to take place online, with the many teething issues that come with kickstarting something new having to be dealt with exclusively through digital channels. 

That’s not the only obstacle they’ve had to face, though.  

Since taking on the role, marketing manager Louise Troy has emigrated to Australia, and her first few days in the country were under strict quarantine conditions. This, unsurprisingly, made for a difficult working environment. 

“But, the success that Best Fertility Now is enjoying was certainly worth the late-night conversations with colleagues under isolation in a hotel. And, thankfully, the team has since adjusted to the time difference,” says Jules. 

More people than ever before are receiving treatment for infertility with educational movements helping to keep people in the know and encourage them to act. 

Jules explains: “More women seem to be struggling due to a variety of factors; 

Firstly, more women are prepared to talk about their story – the stigma around infertility although still there is easing, so we hear about it more.

Secondly more women are leaving it later to have a family and although it’s good to be mature enough to start a family it brings consequences for fertility.

Thirdly, male factor – some scientists are predicting most men will have some sort of fertility problems by 2045 – is finally being recognised as half the problem and because men are beginning to talk about their problems, the medical profession is taking more notice of both sides.”

Diane Cooke
Diane Cooke is a three times award-winning journalist who has worked for UK national/regional newspapers, magazines and websites.

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